Baptist Health introduces innovative device for aortic aneurysm repair

Technology provides patients a long-lasting seal to preserve blood flow, enhance recovery

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Continuing to offer a full spectrum of care for vascular diseases using the most state-of-the-art technology available, Baptist Health is the first health system in the southeastern United States to introduce the Food and Drug Administration-approved Gore Excluder Conformable AAA Endoprosthesis to treat aneurysms found inside the largest blood vessel of the body. The health system implanted its first such device on March 31.

This device permanently seals off aneurysms located in the abdominal section of the aorta and maintains the pathway for blood to circulate unobstructed. The device can be implanted while a patient is under local, regional or general anesthesia through a small puncture site in the groin, eliminating the need for invasive, open surgery to restore blood flow.

Implanted by a physician using real-time X-ray imaging called fluoroscopy, the device is made up of two pieces, a flexible body created from a long-lasting synthetic material and a sturdy outer metal stent structure. When inserted, it reduces blood loss compared to traditional, open surgery where the abdomen is cut open to access the aneurysm, speeding recovery and helping patients leave the hospital faster following their procedure.

Dr. Erin Moore, vascular surgeon at Baptist Health, is one of six physicians in the U.S. to be the first to offer this device to patients affected by abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA).

“AAAs can cause the largest blood vessel in a patient’s body, the aorta, to swell to several times its normal size. If the aneurysm grows too large, it can rupture, resulting in significant injury or even death,” Moore said. “This device eliminates the risk of aortic aneurysm rupture through a low-risk, minimally invasive intervention and will significantly improve the peace of mind for AAA patients post-procedure.”

Before being approved by the FDA, an 80-patient study was conducted to assess the safety and effectiveness of the prosthesis.  Leading the way in innovative research that will transform the way health systems care for those affected by vascular disease, two Baptist Health patients are currently participating in a secondary arm of a clinical trial to further evaluate the device’s efficacy. Results from the trial will be available in early summer 2021. 

Implantations of the new device will be performed in the cardiovascular operating room located at Baptist Medical Center Jacksonville.

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